past events

 

november 11, 2017

Ornament Making workshop

The Elling House invited all to assist the Elling Elves in creating our unique handmade ornaments. These ornaments are given to the guests at the Splendid Feast. Each participant was provided lunch and was also able to take one of the wonderful ornaments home to adorn their own tree. Thank you to all who attended!

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October 7, 2017

Felt United - felting workshop

The EHAHC celebrated the annual International Day of Felt – “Felt United”.  The goal of Felt United is to connect felt makers around the world to help raise awareness of felt and the properties of wool and other fibers.  Felt is mans oldest known textile, made from natural fibers, water, soap and agitation.  This process has produced non-woven fabrics for shelter, personal warmth, and creative expression.  A group participated in the global event and created a whimsical felted angel.  Fiber artist Elizabeth “BJ” Raddel joined others to let imaginations flow.  To learn more you can visit Felt United at www.feltunited.com.


September 16, 2017

Bozeman Symphony Far Afield program featuring Absaroka Winds

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The Far Afield program, established in 1992, takes Bozeman Symphony chamber ensembles to rural communities to present free performances and share their musical perspectives.  Far Afield enables the audience to see, hear and feel the music being created live instead of through the media of television or radio.

Absaroka Winds is an ensemble made up of four professional woodwind players and educators who perform on flute, oboe, English horn, and bassoon. The group’s repertoire is far ranging, consisting of traditional woodwind quartets, and music in a variety of styles arranged especially for this unique ensemble.

The members of Absaroka Winds are: Patricia Gates, flute; Sandra Stimson, oboe; Beth Antonopulos, oboe and English horn, and Paul Gates, bassoon.


September 16, 2017

Artist of the Month reception

~ Barbara Swan, fine art photographer

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Art is the window to the creative soul.  It makes us think; it makes us feel; it makes us respond; whether it be positive or negative.  Each viewer sees the image in her/his own way, bringing a personal perspective and life-experience to the process.My initial inspiration to record the world around me through photography was a month-long trip through Greece, Israel & Egypt in 1992.  I enjoy observing cultures different from my own, and being awed by ancient ruins and sites previously glimpsed only in books.  The images I create are both color and black & white, and may incorporate hand-coloring.The focus of my art is capturing people and natural scenes in a way that honors the uniqueness of each subject.  I aim to share the variety of culture and beauty I have observed in my travels and in my home states of California and Montana.  The goal of my images is to leave the observer with a sense of wonder and a new connection to the surrounding world.I enjoy the magic of bringing images to life through photography, and the camaraderie and inspiration shared with fellow photographers and artists. 


September 14, 2017

Notable authors lecture series at the Linderman Cabin, Laurin, MT

The Legacy of A River Runs through It: An Evening with John N. Maclean

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The EHAHC, in partnership with the Virginia City Preservation Alliance, sponsored their fourth series of history programs in 2017.  Once again, the programs were held in the beautifully restored cabin of Frank Bird Linderman; on the grounds of the historic Robber’s Roost near Laurin, MT.  The general theme of the 2017 series focused upon notable Montana authors.

The book and movie of A River Runs Through It have had a deep and lasting effect on Montana, its rivers, and its literary legacy. But what exactly is the nature of the book? In a way, it’s one-time flash of brilliance at the end of a long life, an argument for creativity in old age.  The author, Norman Maclean, tried all his life to be an author, but only came into his own in his 70s. But A River wasn’t Maclean’s last book. Part of his ongoing legacy is his contribution to the literature of wildland fire, Young Men and Fire. His son, John N., continued the tradition with his own book, Fire On The Mountain, and subsequent books chronicling fatal wildland fires and their implications. A quarter century ago, books about wildland fire were few and far between: today, there are shelves full, and more to come as fire in the wild becomes a greater concern to more people each year.

About John Maclean: 

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John Norman Maclean, an award-winning author and journalist, has written about wildland fire for more than two decades. Before turning to fire, Maclean was for 30 years a journalist with The Chicago Tribune, most of that time as diplomatic correspondent in Washington, DC. He was one of the “Kissinger 14,” the group of media who regularly traveled with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger during the era of shuttle diplomacy. Maclean resigned from The Tribune in 1995 to write Fire On The Mountain, an acclaimed account of the 1994 fire on Storm King Mountain in Colorado that took the lives of fourteen firefighters. Maclean divides his time between Washington, D.C., and the West.

Financial support for this series was provided by Humanities Montana and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


August 31, 2017

Notable authors lecture series at the Linderman Cabin, Laurin, MT

Ivan Doig and the Historical Novel with Dr. O. Alan Weltzien

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The EHAHC, in partnership with the Virginia City Preservation Alliance, sponsored their fourth series of history programs in 2017.  Once again, the programs were held in the beautifully restored cabin of Frank Bird Linderman; on the grounds of the historic Robber’s Roost near Laurin, MT.  The general theme of the 2017 series focused upon notable Montana authors.

Ivan Doig (1939-2015) was born in White Sulphur Springs, Montana, and grew up along the Rocky Mountain Front where much of his writing takes place. His first book, the highly acclaimed memoir This House of Sky, was a finalist for the National Book Award. A former ranch hand, newspaperman, and magazine editor, Doig is a graduate of Northwestern University where he received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in journalism. He also held a PhD in history from the University of Washington. He was widely known for his sixteen fiction and non-fiction books set mostly in his Montana, celebrating the landscape and people of the post-war American West.

O. Alan Weltzien, longtime Montana Wilderness Association member (incl. State Council) and
Professor of English at UMW (Dillon), has published dozens or articles and ten books, most
recently Exceptional Mountains: A Cultural History of the Pacific Northwest Volcanoes (Univ.
Nebraska Press, 2016), and Rembrandt in the Stairwell (FootHills Publishing, 2016), his third
book of poetry. Weltzien still skis in winter and scrambles peaks in summer. He never tires of
the endless diversity of Montana mountainscapes and loves to hike above timberline.

Financial support for this series was provided by Humanities Montana and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


August 11, 2017

Willson & McKee concert

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Kim McKee received 15 years of classical training before turning to traditional Irish and Scottish music, 28 years ago! She moves effortlessly between her instruments and her pallate includes hammered and mountain dulcimer, folk harp, accordion, guitar and bodhran, and she never passes up an opportunity to teach a Ceili dance! Ken Willson is the pulsing folk drive, with an engaging tenor voice and tasteful guitar and bouzouki foundations to the unique material. A weaver of wit and tales, he can also spin a fine Ceili swing on the dance floor!

Collecting experiences, stories and humor from 20 years of touring together, this pair has focused on educational programming, concert venues, college campuses, master classes, workshops, cultural events and festivals, and they have fine tuned their stage performances to be anything but predictable, traditional, or expected.

Past appearances on EHAHC stage:

8/15/15     8/23/13     8/25/12     8/12/11     8/13/10     8/14/09


August 11, 2017

Artist of the Month reception

~ Shirley Anderson Sylvester, painter

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Born and raised in the Bitterroot Valley of western Montana, Shirley and her family have always lived on a farm east of Corvallis. Shirley began painting with oils in 1984 and watercolor in 1995.  She enjoys plein aire painting along the rivers and in the mountains of the Bitterroot Valley as well as different areas of Montana. She likes to create small paintings. This gives her the ability to capture a moment and a place, a snapshot in time. Painting miniatures gives her the liberty to experiment with light, color and compositions.  Old homesteads and barns have great interest to Shirley, she says, “I like to imagine the lives of the folks that lived there. They represent a disappearing heritage of our country’s past.” Shirley is also involved with archaeology. She is on the board of the Montana Archaeological Society. She has visited nearly 100 pictograph and petroglyph sites in the northwest. She incorporates these interests and images in her paintings on occasion. She also paints tepees to represent the different tribal cultures of the northwest.  Shirley believes an artist should paint what they love and what inspires them; this is what breathes life and spark into a piece.


July 30, 2017

Magic Show by Butte Magic

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Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, this was your chance to see the spectacle of a lifetime! Magic, juggling, feats of strength, and more! Behold, as the performers of Butte Magic performed in a death-defying, jaw dropping, and plain ol' puzzling show!

Past appearances on EHAHC stage:

7/24/16


July 16, 2017

Growling Old Men Concert

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The Elling House Arts and Humanities Center presented “Growling Old Men” in concert. Ben Winship (mandolins & vocals) and John Lowell (guitar & vocals) are both veterans of the Northern Rockies acoustic music world. Together the duo presents a tight yet relaxed set of original and traditional bluegrass songs, ballads and tunes. Their CDs are truly a joint effort with the lead singing, songwriting and picking duties shared throughout. Influenced equally by the music of the Appalachian hills and the western plains, their music is at once simple and powerful - furthermore, it reflects the genuine sense of fun these two guys get from playing together.  The duo blends each artist’s individual talents as musician, songwriter, and vocalist in a repertoire of original and traditional bluegrass tunes and folk ballads, played on guitar and mandolin.  Growling Old Men have performed on A Prairie Home Companion and Garrison Keillor has said, "I've been hearing about these young men for a long time but they do not come around American centers of population to advance their careers.  They have isolated themselves out here in Montana and Victor, Idaho on account of their lifelong obsession with fishing.  Not so old, not so growly, a real fine bluegrass duo.  They're great."

The evening program, ideally suited for an intimate venue such as the Elling House, included a blend of well-rehearsed material and few new songs hot off the press – Ben and John like to keep it fresh with an edge of improvisational risk taking.  They strive to contrast simplicity with complexity - all with good tone and a warm sense of humor. 

PAST APPEARANCES ON EHAHC STAGE:

7/30/16     7/31/15     7/25/14     8/2/13     7/8/12     10/15/10


July 16, 2017

Artist of the Month reception

~ Zach Babat, painter

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Zach was taken from us too soon, but his legacy will live on forever in his art. Zach was a professional artist and Alaskan Bush Pilot. He split his time between Montana and Alaska, the two states with the best fish and wildlife in the world.  Zach spent over 20 year years as an outdoor guide and professional bush pilot. These experiences gave Zach his inspiration for his artwork. Zach had the opportunity to get face to face with the wildlife species of the west.  Zach said, “It is the close interaction with the animals, their personalities I try to capture not just the horns, claws and teeth.”  Zach used watercolor paint, both transparent and opaque, exclusively to bring the animals and fish to life. Zach perfected the use of canvas board for his paintings, which eliminated the need for glass. Most people viewing his original artwork don’t realize they are watercolor because of the vividness of the colors and lack of glass.  Zach’s wife, Kerry, will continue his legacy by continuing to offer prints and select originals for sale. In addition, multiple books are in the process of being written using Zach’s artwork. A Zach Babat Scholarship fund is also in the process of being created. 


July 18, 2017

Notable authors lecture series at the Linderman Cabin, Laurin, MT

Bob Brown presented a program on Dorothy Johnson

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The EHAHC, in partnership with the Virginia City Preservation Alliance, sponsored their fourth series of history programs in 2017.  Once again, the programs were held in the beautifully restored cabin of Frank Bird Linderman; on the grounds of the historic Robber’s Roost near Laurin, MT.  The general theme of the 2017 series focused upon notable Montana authors.

Dorothy Johnson (1905 - 1984) was the author of numerous articles and books on western history and fiction. She is Montana's foremost writer of western fiction.  Her three most notable works, The Hanging Tree, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and A Man Called Horse, were made into movies. She grew up in Whitefish, where her talents as a writer quickly became apparent in her first jobs with the Whitefish and Kalispell newspapers. She sold her first article in the 1930's to the Saturday Evening Post for $400.00.  She wrote prolifically for the rest of her life.  Her nonfiction books include The Bloody Bozeman and the Bedside Book of Bastards.  During the course of her career she was a researcher at the Montana Historical Society, Manager of the Montana Press Association, and taught creative writing at the University of Montana.

Bob Brown is a native Montanan and a “shirt-tail” relative of the Linderman family.  He is a Navy veteran, earned a degree in history from MSU, was a high school history teacher, and served for 26 years in the Montana Legislature; as Secretary of State and concluding as President of the State Senate.  Although officially retired, he is a visiting lecturer on the American Civil War at the University of Montana, a contributing columnist to several Montana newspapers, and on the Board of Directors for the Montana Historical Society.

Financial support for this series was provided by Humanities Montana and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


June 30, 2017

Ken Egan book reading

Montana 1864, Hope and Dread in Montana Literature, and Writers Under the Rims: A Yellowstone County Anthology.

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Ken Egan has served as the executive director of Humanities Montana since 2009. He earned his B.A. in English at the University of Montana, his M.A. and Ph.D. in American Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He taught English at Middlebury College, Rocky Mountain College, and Drury University.  He served as department and divisional chair at Rocky and Drury and sat on the board of Humanities Montana (then Montana Committee for the Humanities) from 1989 to 1992. Egan is a member of the Leadership Montana Class of 2013. His books include Montana 1864, Hope and Dread in Montana Literature, and Writers Under the Rims: A Yellowstone County Anthology.

Financial support for this series was provided by Humanities Montana and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


June 25, 2017

Jack Horner : Why Dinosaurs had Horns, Shields, Spikes,and other Accoutrements

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Paleontologist Jack Horner discovered the first dinosaur eggs in the Western Hemisphere, the first evidence of dinosaur colonial nesting, the first evidence of parental care among dinosaurs, and the first dinosaur embryos.  

Horner's research covers a wide range of topics about dinosaurs, including their behavior, physiology, ecology and evolution. Due to struggles with the learning disability, dyslexia, Horner does not hold a formal college degree but was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science from the University of Montana in 1986. Also in 1986 he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship.  

He's the retired Curator of Paleontology at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana, and is widely acknowledged to be the inspiration for the main character in the book and film Jurassic Park.


June 9, 2017

Mike Dowling concert

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When the late, great Vassar Clements heard Mike Dowling play guitar back in 1975 he did the sensible thing. He hired him. Mike was the guitarist in Vassar's first touring band and can be heard on his Grammy-nominated "Nashville Jam". Clements called him simply, "One of the finest guitarists there is, anywhere."Echoing that sentiment is an ever-growing chorus of music critics, guitar students, and acoustic music fans from throughout the world.

Mike digs deep into the musical bag of American roots guitar, favoring the melodic Piedmont style of acoustic blues masters like Mississippi John Hurt and slide great Tampa Red. But Mike can't be pigeonholed as a blues player, or even as a fingerstylist. He's far too versatile for that. From bottleneck blues to vintage jazz and much more in between, Mike's musicality, depth, and mastery of the instrument translates fluently to flattop, archtop, and resonator guitars alike.

Mike grew up in central Wisconsin and early in his career in the midwest caught the ear of jazz violin great Joe Venuti and mandolinist Jethro Burns. In the 1970's, in addition to touring with Clements, he worked and recorded with Burns and Venuti in Chicago and in between jobs took time off to move to California when he had the opportunity to study with the late, great George Barnes. Barnes had been "the" session guy for many years, recording with everyone from Big Bill Broonzy to Tony Bennett. "I was very fortunate to be able to spend some time with him", Mike says. " He was so tasteful, so rhythmic. He set the bar very high for me and he continues to be an inspiration."

PAST APPEARANCES ON EHAHC STAGE:

6/3/16     6/13/15     10/5/13     6/15/12     6/18/11     6/19/10


June 9, 2017

Artist of the Month reception

~ Richard Flager, sculptor/painter/photographer

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Richard Flager was born and raised in Sheridan Montana and has resided in this great state his whole life. Richard has always been interested in all forms of art and the intricate detail of nature. Detail is what you will see in all forms of his art including the beautiful curves and smoothness of his sculpture capturing a statement in each art piece. Richard moves into the exquisite colors of natural flora of Montana down to the most delicate dewdrop. View the numerous photographs that this artist has taken while in the back hills of Montana so prevalent of the beautiful valleys and mountains of the Sheridan and Dillon Montana countryside. Totem Poles are the most current artwork being constructed by Mr. Flager and at times you will see him with a double hood jacket and sweatshirt outside in the cold working on his lates Totem Pole. This wonderful Montana artist has a variety of ways expressing his artistic talent.